Speaking with Greenville’s Poet Laureate

by

Listen & Be Heard Podcast, Episode 7

Tony Robles interviews Glenis Redmond, The first Poet Laureate of Greenville, SC.

Tony Robles interviews Greenville, SC Poet Laureate, Glenis Redmond. Pilar Uribe gives us quotes from notable women of past and present. Martha Cinader hosts and shares excerpts from a journal about a journal made in China. Crystal Waters contributes another episode from Martha’s Kitchen Garden about snapping turtles, with James Cruell and Kirk.

00;00;01;05 - 00;00;27;29
Speaker 1
If no one was needed any more to make the blank books. If they were designed and printed and shipped and trucked by a mechanic assembly line and no one knew how to make them any more, and no one cared how they were made anymore, and no one knew how to write anymore. Then no one would know how to write on the lines or what to write on the lines or read what someone else wrote on the lines.

00;00;28;06 - 00;00;57;12
Speaker 1
Or care if there was a storm in the whole container of blank books, was caught in a storm and spilled into the sea and sunk to the depths to join the bones of slaves littered among sunken treasures and creatures without eyes to read or see. Sunlight. Do these words mean anything at all? Before I learned to make paper, before I learned to find the materials, to make paper.

00;00;57;23 - 00;01;26;21
Speaker 1
Before I barter for the knowledge and the materials to make the paper stitched the binding print straight lines on each page to assist me in writing a legible script, weave or knit or crochet or sew a ribbon for a bookmark. Cure some leather. Kill the beast for the leather or forgo leather for a natural fiber grown in my garden, tilled and watered by me on communal land.

00;01;26;22 - 00;02;04;26
Speaker 1
I have earned earned the privilege to cultivate for my benefit. Am I saying anything at all? If I didn't create the means for me to say it? Don't have a clue, an inkling where the ink in my pen was formulated, measured, poured into the plastic tube with a metal tip destined for the distant trash heap beyond my immediate vision in an imaginary junk heaven that is preferable to the real junk islands floating out there where shipping containers pass each other in the night, perhaps on autopilot.

00;02;04;26 - 00;02;42;24
Speaker 1
If not today, someday soon. Could I be writing anything that means anything at all with such a pen? A pen that will end but never end. A a pen that will end but never end. Even when this book is tossed and the words that slide so easily along the page, leaving my mind to be available to be looked at, perhaps only by me, or maybe someone else hoping to find out about an illicit romance or hidden fortune who will find only disappointment or bewilderment or scorn.

00;02;43;03 - 00;03;36;19
Speaker 1
The story contained inside this still partially blank book is this book the color of the paper? Is it white ivory off white parchment? Who chose this paper? Was it the cheapest available or is it the best for writing with a pen or a pencil? Is for the West. Is college ruled to fit more lines on a page? The lines are blue, not black, so as not to distract from the words meant to be written on the lines, confusions, oversexed carved housewife love poems of a lonely teens, shopping lists, memos, dream diaries, diatribes, terrorist plots all destined to be tossed one day, maybe only with a few pages scrawled upon, and the remaining ones blank taunting,

00;03;36;19 - 00;04;04;13
Speaker 1
haunted by the bands that touched it as it traveled on a river belt that also was created on a line untouched by hands that longed to touch something else, or recently touched someone who they would never see again, but didn't know that at the time. Can these words mean anything? Can they tell the story without knowing the story of the book?

00;04;04;23 - 00;04;42;19
Speaker 1
It is written in all destined, all destined to be tossed one day, maybe only with a few pages scrawled upon, and the remaining ones blank taunting the haunted by the hands that touched it as it traveled on a rubber belt that also was created on a line and touched by hands that longed to touch or something else, or recently touched someone who they would never see again but didn't know that at the time.

00;04;43;02 - 00;04;51;10
Speaker 1
Can these words mean anything? Can they tell a story without knowing the story of the book? It is written in?

00;04;55;12 - 00;05;31;01
Speaker 1
This is listen and be heard. I'm Martha, senator. Today you will hear an interview by Tony Robles of Glen is Redmond, the first poet laureate of Greenville, South Carolina. Pilar Uribe shares quotes from prominent women of years gone by and something a little new. Lately, the discussion of keeping a journal has come up in my life. Tony Robles told me his Uncle Al, the great poet of San Francisco, used to encourage him to keep a journal.

00;05;32;02 - 00;06;03;23
Speaker 1
And the same recommendation is often repeated to aspiring writers. I've kept journals off and on most of my life. I lost or through most of them away. But they still served a purpose, I think or I hope I would share some bits from a journal I kept in today's podcast. I want to share some bits from a journal I kept about the journal I was writing in.

00;06;05;11 - 00;06;31;19
Speaker 1
If you keep a journal, please send in some of your entries and maybe we'll make it a thing on the show. As always, you can leave a comment on the site or email me at Ed at listen and be heard dot net. Now we will return to Tony Robbins interview with Glenis Redmond. But first, another quote from Pilar.

00;06;34;08 - 00;07;15;20
Speaker 1
This is Listen and be heard. I'm Martha, Senator. Today you will hear an interview by Tony Robles of Glenis Redmond, the first poet laureate of Greenville, South Carolina. Pilar Uribe shares quotes from prominent women of years gone by and something a little new. Lately, the discussion of keeping a journal has come up in my life. Tony Robles told me his Uncle Al, the great poet of San Francisco, used to encourage him to keep a journal and the same recommendation is often repeated to aspiring writers.

00;07;16;19 - 00;07;50;22
Speaker 1
I've kept journals off and on most of my life. I lost or through most of them, awake, but they still served a purpose, I think or I hope I would share some bits from a journal I kept. In today's podcast, I want to share some bits from a journal I kept about the journal I was writing in. If you keep a journal, please send in some of your entries and maybe we'll make it a thing on the show.

00;07;51;09 - 00;08;30;23
Speaker 1
As always, you can leave a comment on the site or email me at editor at Listen and be heard net. Now we will return to Tony Robbins interview with Glenis Redmond. But first, another quote from Pilar. Hmm. There is the thought from a journal from years ago. And if you've been listening, then you know that Glen Redmond also picked up the habit, the the joint, the journey of keeping a journal.

00;08;31;19 - 00;09;01;23
Speaker 1
And if you keep a journal, maybe you'd like to share a little bit from yours, like I've been doing for mine. We've also been hearing from Pilar Uribe, who mentioned quite a few people already, women, notable women. Margaret Chase Smith. Andrea Dworkin. Margaret Thatcher. Condoleeza Rice. Ann Richards. Eleanor Roosevelt. One of my favorites. And we will hear more from Pilar.

00;09;02;14 - 00;09;35;17
Speaker 1
And we're going to go on and listen to more from Glenis Redmond in an interview that Tony Robles conducted this past weekend. And you can watch the whole video because I'm just giving you pieces and bits of it. There's more from Tony and from Glennis in a Zoom video that you can find it. Listen and be heard. Nick as well as the complete videos of other interviews that Tony and myself have done of authors.

00;09;35;18 - 00;10;07;20
Speaker 1
And if you keep coming back, you'll find that we will keep talking to authors and people involved in the publishing industry. And I don't know, publisher like publishers and maybe even book distributors and bookshop owners. And if you happen to be any one of those people and don't want to wait for an invitation, you can contact me at Ed at it.

00;10;07;20 - 00;10;39;02
Speaker 1
Listening be heard. We're trying to keep the conversation going here, to listen and to be heard. And we're going to listen. More now to our poet laureate here in Greenville, South Carolina, our first poet laureate. And she'll tell you in a little while that not only is she the first poet laureate, but we're going to have a youth poet laureate who should have been announced yesterday.

00;10;39;15 - 00;11;11;14
Speaker 1
Now that I'm finally getting this podcast onto the website and so maybe I can find out more about that, and maybe then you'll be able to find out more about it on the Web page for this particular episode seven of Listen and Be Heard. Hmm. There is a thought from a journal from years ago, and if you've been listening, then you know that Glen is.

00;11;11;15 - 00;11;43;21
Speaker 1
Redmond also picked up the habit to join the journey of keeping a journal. And if you keep a journal, maybe you'd like to share a little bit from yours like I've been doing for mine. We've also been hearing from Pilar Uribe, who mentioned quite a few people already, women, notable women, Margaret Chase Smith. Andrea Dworkin. Margaret Thatcher. Condoleeza Rice.

00;11;43;21 - 00;12;24;14
Speaker 1
Ann Richards. Eleanor Roosevelt. One of my favorites. And we will hear more from Pilar. And we're going to go on and listen to more from Glenis Redmond, an interview that Tony Rose conducted this past weekend. And you can watch the whole video because I'm just giving you pieces and bits of it. There's more from Tony and from Glennis in a Zoom video that you can find to listen and be heard dot net as well as the complete videos of other interviews that Tony and myself have done of authors.

00;12;24;15 - 00;12;56;17
Speaker 1
And if you keep coming back, you'll find that we will keep talking to authors and people involved in the publishing industry. And I don't know, publisher like publishers and maybe even book distributors and bookshop owners. And if you happen to be any one of those people and don't want to wait for an invitation, you can contact me at Ed at.

00;12;56;17 - 00;13;28;02
Speaker 1
Listen to be heard net. We're trying to keep the conversation going here to listen and to be heard. And we're going to listen more now to our poet laureate here in Greenville, South Carolina, our first poet laureate. And she'll tell you in a little while that not only is she the first poet laureate, but we're going to have a youth poet laureate who should have been announced yesterday.

00;13;28;14 - 00;14;00;05
Speaker 1
Now that I'm finally getting this podcast onto the website and so maybe I can find out more about that. And maybe then you'll be able to find out more about it on the Web page for this particular episode seven of Listen and Be Heard. You've been listening to a conversation between Tony Robles and Glenis Redmond, the first poet laureate of Greenville, South Carolina.

00;14;00;24 - 00;14;30;25
Speaker 1
It was not the entire conversation that they had. If you would like to not only listen, but see the conversation, please visit, listen and be heard dot net where you can view the entire Zoom interview that Tony conducted with Glennis. My name is Martha, Senator, and this is Listen and be Heard. You also heard Pilar Uribe. Give us quotes from Margaret Chase Smith, Andrea Dworkin, Margaret Thatcher.

00;14;30;25 - 00;15;08;27
Speaker 1
Condoleezza Rice. Ann Richards, Eleanor Roosevelt. Pilar Uribe contributed quotes by notable women. And I was reading from a journal about a journal. And I would like to hear from you your thoughts about this interview with Glennis that had so much information in it about, oh, good kitty culture, Dave, the Potter, Afro-Asian or Asian or however she said it, or at versus Afro Carolinian.

00;15;09;28 - 00;15;47;23
Speaker 1
She has a long history here in both South Carolina and North Carolina and we thank her for joining us here at Listen and be Heard. You're welcome to join the conversation either by submitting poetry, articles, column ideas, podcasts, proposals, or just feedback about what you heard in this podcast. Please visit, listen and be heard. Need to leave your comments or you can email me at Ed or listen and be heard.

00;15;48;00 - 00;16;11;17
Speaker 1
Net record a memo and send me that and maybe I'll play it on the podcast. The point of the whole thing of listening and being heard is to do both. So please join the conversation and I'll be back next week with a new episode. Thank you for listening.

00;16;13;18 - 00;16;40;28
Speaker 1
You've been listening to a conversation between Tony Robles and Glenis Redmond, the first poet laureate of Greenville, South Carolina. It was not the entire conversation that they had. If you would like to not only listen, but see the conversation, please visit, listen and be heard dot net where you can view the entire Zoom interview that Tony conducted with Glynis.

00;16;41;15 - 00;17;32;21
Speaker 1
My name is Martha Senator and this is Listen and be Heard. You also heard Pilar Uribe give us quotes from Margaret Chase Smith, Andrea Dworkin, Margaret Thatcher. Condoleezza Rice. Ann Richards, Eleanor Roosevelt. Pilar Uribe contributed quotes by notable women. And I was reading from a journal about a journal. And I would like to hear from you your thoughts about this interview with Glennis that had so much information in it about arugula, kitchen culture, Dave the Potter, Afro-Asian or Asian or however she said it or versus Afro Carolinian.

00;17;33;22 - 00;18;11;18
Speaker 1
She has a long history here in both South Carolina and North Carolina. And we thank her for joining us here at Listen and be Heard. You're welcome to join the conversation either by submitting poetry articles, column ideas, podcast proposals, or just feedback about what you heard in this podcast. Please visit, listen and be heard. Note to leave your comments or you can email me at Ed at listen and be heard.

00;18;11;25 - 00;18;47;17
Speaker 1
Net record a memo and send me that and maybe I'll play it on the podcast. The point of the whole thing of listening and being heard is to do both. So please join the conversation and I'll be back next week with a new episode. Thank you for listening. You can also go to the web page at Listen and be heard dot net for episode seven, which is this podcast that you've been listening to.

00;18;47;28 - 00;19;30;27
Speaker 1
And you will find a list of links to many of the things and people that were mentioned in this podcast, which can further enhance your whole experience of what it is to listen and be heard, especially if you then tell us about it. Stick around to the very end and you'll hear a conversation about turtles catching turtles, snapping turtles, and you'll be able to find the video for that as well.

00;19;31;00 - 00;19;41;17
Speaker 1
It was in the movie, heard it. It's a short film made by my daughter, Crystal Clear Waters. Thank you for listening.

00;19;42;13 - 00;20;10;03
Speaker 2
Home is a complicated answer. I mean, I guess the short answer would be Greenville, South Carolina, because that's where my my my family, my parents are from. But my father was in the Air Force. So we lived all over the country and across the world. And so I really was influenced by my Air Force upbringing. But when you have Southern parents, you have seven roots.

00;20;10;10 - 00;20;41;29
Speaker 1
A brief search on a modern tool called an iPad reveals that there are numerous notebook manufacturers selling wholesale from China to presumably millions of people around the world who want to write or draw or calculate on blank pages preserved between protective covers so that presumably they can be looked at or referred to again at some future time.

00;20;42;04 - 00;20;54;24
Speaker 3
Having been a member of Congress for almost 24 years as the only female senator, Margaret Chase Smith was the first woman in American history to announce her campaign for the presidency in 1964.

00;20;55;04 - 00;21;13;04
Speaker 2
I'm a traveler. I'm a wanderer, mostly, but Greenville, South Carolina, which I said I would never live come back to. I came back because my mother got sick. And, you know, to come back and see the place where I'm from with adult eyes really opened a whole new world to me and my roots.

00;21;13;13 - 00;21;39;29
Speaker 3
In a 1949 speech, she challenged the popular outlook on the proper place of a woman. My answer to that question is short and simple. A woman's proper place is everywhere. You never hear the comment that men are all right in their place because their place has never been restricted. If there is one proper role for women today, it is that of alert and responsible citizens in the fullest sense of the word.

00;21;40;14 - 00;21;48;13
Speaker 3
Citizenship is without sex. It makes no distinction between the rights and responsibilities of men and women in America.

00;21;48;20 - 00;22;18;29
Speaker 2
I came back to Greenville when I was 13, so I didn't grow up here until my high school years. So I spent my my latter middle middle school junior high and high school here and then went to as Erskine College was just about an hour away from Piedmont, where I'm technically from. So I, you know, I had I had some really big cultural experiences that shaped me before we came back to the south.

00;22;19;06 - 00;22;35;27
Speaker 2
I was born in South Carolina. I'm the only one of five children who was born in my parents native state. Everybody else was born somewhere else. My brother before me was born in every France. So, yeah, that's that's that's my story. That's my, my origin story and it.

00;22;35;28 - 00;22;36;29
Speaker 4
Creating in.

00;22;37;13 - 00;22;41;00
Speaker 5
Love. And it living it is love and.

00;22;43;06 - 00;23;17;28
Speaker 1
This is listen to be heard. I'm martha, senator. Today you will hear an interview by attorney rob lewis of glenis redmond, the first poet laureate of Greenville, South Carolina. Pilar Uribe shares quotes from prominent women of years gone by and something a little new. Lately, the discussion of keeping a journal has come up in my life. Toni Rosas told me his uncle Al, the great poet of San Francisco, used to encourage him to keep a journal.

00;23;18;29 - 00;23;51;09
Speaker 1
And the same recommendation is often repeated to aspiring writers. I've kept journals off and on most of my life. I lost or through most of them, away. But they still served a purpose, I think, or I hope. In today's podcast I want to share some bits from a journal I kept about the journal I was writing in. If you keep a journal, please send in some of your entries and maybe we'll make it a thing on the show.

00;23;51;26 - 00;24;09;06
Speaker 1
As always, you can leave a comment on the site or email me at editor at Listen and be heard. Now we will return to Tony Roma's interview with Glenis Redmond. But first, another quote from Pilar.

00;24;10;09 - 00;24;27;13
Speaker 3
Hi, this is listen and be heard. I'm Billary. Women intend to save themselves when sacrificing some women, but only the freedom of all women protects any woman. Andrea Dworkin.

00;24;29;00 - 00;24;52;12
Speaker 2
Well, this is why I'm writing books because I'm still understanding my parents and they're lit and I'm just not really understanding them because I really, you know, when you're in a family, there are things you talk about things you don't talk about things that are assumed. You know, I didn't know really the fight and the war that my parents lived in segregated South Carolina.

00;24;52;18 - 00;25;17;04
Speaker 2
Like I knew of it. I was reared to understand these cultural barriers. But because we were elsewhere, they didn't come into play as much until we moved back. And then now, as an elder myself, I'm looking back and going, Wait a minute. Okay, this is why my father was this way. This is why my mother was this way.

00;25;17;14 - 00;25;38;07
Speaker 2
Because my father's people, they they they moved a lot every year and they're in their poverty. And then my mother was in their poverty. They were sharecroppers, but they had they had a plot of land and they stayed, which made them very different. They were very resourceful with the land. They they they grew everything they had cattle, that sort of thing.

00;25;38;07 - 00;26;00;12
Speaker 2
So it made a difference of how I looked at my father was never going to do physical labor. My father was a musician, so he got away from it from like, I'm not picking cotton. I'm not. But my mother did pick cotton and she picked throughout her high school years, you know. And I you know, I it's now now slowing down and being here.

00;26;00;26 - 00;26;09;05
Speaker 2
I understand them so much better that my father's gone. But I'm still like this is what I'm writing about now.

00;26;10;15 - 00;26;13;23
Speaker 3
You may have to fight a battle more than once to win it.

00;26;14;28 - 00;26;45;04
Speaker 1
Margaret Thatcher made in China for 244102707a book of blank pages with printed blue lines for writing. Was the paper made in China, too? Was the ink for the printed lines made in China? Was the machine that printed the lines on the paper made in China?

00;26;45;17 - 00;27;12;15
Speaker 2
I'm pretty sure poetry came to me. I think I was you know, I you know, I'm not going to get into a debate with anyone, whether you're born in poet or you can become a poet. But I really believe that I've had I think my predisposition made it easy for me to become a poet. And even before I could write, I remember taking snapshots of memories and cataloging them and not knowing what I was going to do with them.

00;27;12;15 - 00;27;32;01
Speaker 2
But it was just like meaningful moments. I know I'm going to come back to this. I'm going to come back to this. And sure enough, there are places when I was four and five that I come back to and and revisit and write about those moments. So I feel like the book, The Listening Skin, I'm getting at my predisposition as a highly sensitive person.

00;27;32;23 - 00;28;10;00
Speaker 2
That's really what that is about. Being the world is kind of too much for you, you know, light, sound, emotion, war or, you know, racism, you know, misogyny, any of anything that, you know, is just too much. And the poetry provided a layer for me telling my story. I think I put on social media the other day that that poetry was my trauma response and my lifeline and my love.

00;28;10;00 - 00;28;40;19
Speaker 2
And I really started writing in earnest when I was 13 at Wood, my junior high school, but heard my first poem at A Black History program when I was in the fifth grade by Jack Earley, who was a civil rights leader and activist. And when I heard that poem, 1968 winners that talked about black people, black life, black living, and then at the end, it's like this will turn into this like walk out my front door, white snow.

00;28;40;26 - 00;29;06;03
Speaker 2
I'm like, whoa. As a fifth grader, I knew that in words there was power. There was an agency that I hadn't claim yet. And poetry kind of came in at that time and just claim me in the fifth grade. And then by the time we had moved back to the south, I had a teacher, English teacher, who assigned us a journal.

00;29;06;03 - 00;29;15;11
Speaker 2
And I began writing and I started writing my feelings out everything that was bothering me, everything that I loved, I put it in my journal.

00;29;16;26 - 00;29;57;05
Speaker 1
Was the binding glue, and the ribbon made in China was the faux alligator imitation leather cover made in China. Were there people making the notebook, the paper, the ribbon, the ink, the binding glue alongside the machines assembled to produce this book? Were they Chinese people working in an assembly line to make paper print lines on paper? Cut the paper fold and bind the paper, put a cover on the book and a sticker on the back that says Made in China and has a barcode and a ten digit number and two other digits on either side of the barcode.

00;29;57;28 - 00;30;19;09
Speaker 1
Or were they immigrants brought into China to stand on in assembly line? And how much do they get paid to put this book together and stack it in a box full of identical books and send it to a dock on the coast of China? Do they go home at night or just sleep at the factory or have a home to go to?

00;30;19;27 - 00;30;39;26
Speaker 1
Are their parents watching their kids? Do they get paid with money or with script that they spend in the company store? Do they ever buy blank books with the lines at attention, ready to be filled with words or sketches? Or would they rather do something else in politics?

00;30;39;26 - 00;30;52;02
Speaker 3
If you want anything said, ask a man if you want anything done, ask a woman. Margaret Thatcher.

00;30;52;02 - 00;31;17;27
Speaker 6
You know what's funny is, you know, it's HSP and highly sensitive people. You know, when you've lived a little bit in, let's say you visited the school and see the different kids, let's say you get invited to to talk about poetry to the students. You can tell who the speakers are. Yes, because you can you can sense that or you will see a little bit of yourself in in them, you know.

00;31;18;11 - 00;31;39;16
Speaker 2
Yes. It's I think HSP is a superpower and you can recognize it in other others. And that's when I see those kids like that, I throw them a lifeline. And that's what I when I get finished talking to a lot of them and it's it's not alone. It's not just just along racial lines. It's long. Every line you can think of who could be an HSP, I call them the others.

00;31;39;16 - 00;32;01;00
Speaker 2
Yeah. The others get in a line and they want to talk to me because they're like, I don't have anybody in my life like you. And I connect what you were saying about, you know, being afraid of the dark. And you you were in touch, you know, when you were five or six years old. Your intuitive, you know, I'm that way and my family think they think I'm odd.

00;32;01;06 - 00;32;05;11
Speaker 2
Then I'm like, well, my God, but, but you're okay, you know?

00;32;05;23 - 00;32;17;22
Speaker 3
So the day has to come when it's not a surprise that a woman has a powerful position. Condoleezza Rice.

00;32;17;22 - 00;32;31;29
Speaker 6
Another thing that was interesting that you had referred to, you know, even referring to yourself as being bi Carolinian, is and then also Afro Carolinian earlier. And I've also heard you Appalachian. You know, Frank, it's warm.

00;32;32;00 - 00;33;01;06
Speaker 2
Yeah, that's Frank Walker. Nikky Finney. Yeah. They point that term. Yeah. And I, I came over Apple Carolinian probably in the early nineties because I, you know, I had run across them, but I was like, wait a minute, I, I, I feel I, you know, where I am is Appalachia. So I'm Appalachian, too. But an Afro Carolinian meant something different because it's like these two Carolinas have a distinct culture in and of itself.

00;33;01;19 - 00;33;36;01
Speaker 2
And so I wanted to harness that and talk about my ancestors coming in. Many of our ancestors came in. Our Ellis Island is Charleston coming in through that port. And then our second middle passage would be, where did you how did your family or your ancestors get from Charleston to wherever they went inland? And so it makes, you know, Carolina South Carolina is where I was born, but North Carolina is where I was granted my poetic wings, I would say, because I moved to Nashville in the nineties.

00;33;36;12 - 00;33;44;16
Speaker 2
So I claim both states and you can get in trouble saying that because people really want you to have your allegiance. But I have a foot firmly in both states.

00;33;45;02 - 00;33;59;03
Speaker 6
Yeah, because my question was, you know, how do those two by Carolinian, how do those personas merge in your work and what are the conflicts within?

00;33;59;09 - 00;34;27;05
Speaker 2
You know, that's a great question. I don't know if there's any conflicts, but I do know this, that I have many relatives in North Carolina. So, I mean, you can just we're just an hour from the border of North Carolina here. And so my father tells a story that one of his aunts on the weekend would take off by foot and walk all the way to North Carolina to visit family.

00;34;27;27 - 00;35;00;09
Speaker 2
And she would stay overnight. And then when she still stayed overnight, she would come back by foot. And that story just told me, I'm like, well, like even though we are rooted here, are we branch out to the mountains. And so there is a line that already went before me. So when I think about my great aunt walking and when I drove up that mountain to go to my very first poetry slam in the nineties, I was already following in her footsteps because she was pretty done it.

00;35;00;18 - 00;35;02;17
Speaker 6
How far how far was that walk?

00;35;03;00 - 00;35;05;16
Speaker 2
It was about 60, 70 miles.

00;35;05;18 - 00;35;46;05
Speaker 1
That's this book has already tossed and turned to see packed most tightly for maximum efficiency and survived the journey crossing above the littered floor of the ocean of commerce and survived the journey to another port where someone unloaded the container, holding it with a crane. Was that person an American? How much did that person get paid? And the trucker who packed it in the back and got it to Staples Warehouse or Staples Warehouse is unionized.

00;35;46;18 - 00;36;15;29
Speaker 1
What those digits mean? So many questions for a book with no answers, just a blank book for me to write in with a plastic pen that says South Carolina in white printed paint with a tiny little palm tree and a sailboat in lines that look like ripples of water. The sticker is mostly rubbed off, but I can just make out that the pen I picked up at the airport must've been.

00;36;15;29 - 00;36;55;11
Speaker 1
But I don't actually remember. But it must have been at the Greenville airport. The pen was made in China. It too crossed the ocean to find its way to my hand. But probably not the Atlantic Ocean, who probably never got near the South Carolina coast. It probably journeyed across the Pacific for me to write with in this book that probably was not in the same container or even barge or maybe even the same port on the Chinese coast, of which I have no idea where the pen or the book might have been shipped from.

00;36;55;11 - 00;37;06;09
Speaker 3
I do not want my tombstone to read. She kept a really clean house. I think I'd like them to remember me by saying she opened government to everyone.

00;37;07;02 - 00;37;20;11
Speaker 2
Ann Richards And for a woman and a black woman to be walking, you know, at that time and you know, here I am, I, you know, I am a road warrior, but I sure am not walking 60 to 70 miles. But.

00;37;20;23 - 00;37;24;13
Speaker 6
You know, I think ask the Uber was that, you know.

00;37;25;25 - 00;37;33;25
Speaker 3
No one can make you feel inferior without your consent. Eleanor Roosevelt.

00;37;33;25 - 00;37;57;22
Speaker 2
My grandmother was 109 when she passed. She was born in 1901 in Waterloo, South Carolina. And I really didn't come to know her until I was 13 when we moved back. But she always was this woman, and she probably was around my age when I met her, but I thought she was ancient then, you know. But she I don't know.

00;37;57;22 - 00;38;17;20
Speaker 2
She held a lot of truths for me. I mean, I'm a first generation college student, and I would go over the I would go about an hour and a half to hour to school, Erskine College. And but I would cross over cotton fields to go to college. But I didn't really know anything about cotton at that point. I knew my parents picked it.

00;38;17;20 - 00;38;46;09
Speaker 2
I knew that was my lineage. But sometimes during college breaks, I would leave and go to Lawrence, which is where my grandmother was, and I would talk to her and let her tell me stories because I was taking history. 112 And Dr. Getty's professor was you know, go home and interview your oldest living relatives. So I started spending time with my grandmother and she started rolling out those stories, and it was powerful.

00;38;46;09 - 00;39;12;04
Speaker 2
But also I the complex helix is here's the church and here's the African ideology and never the to sell me but they really are together like so one moment, you know she's praising Jesus while she's smoking a cigaret and watching Rosslyn. Yeah. And she would argue with you whether it was real or not because she believed in it.

00;39;12;12 - 00;39;46;21
Speaker 2
And but I also realized she always told me, follow the old ways. And I never knew what that meant by the old ways. But as I get older, I understand that my grandmother was talking about the land and she was talking about what grew from the land as herbs and roots and those sorts of things for healing. And a lot of that does stem back to Africa, you know, and she was the one, the truth healer, you know, the teller and the dealer that held that.

00;39;46;21 - 00;40;14;21
Speaker 2
So when you're speaking of college where you're getting educated, but you're also losing some of what you came from, I started holding on to more of what I came from, the more education I got, because I realized this woman was wise and this woman was the carrier of knowledge and wisdom for our family.

00;40;14;21 - 00;40;34;05
Speaker 3
Do what you feel in your heart to be right, for you'll be criticized anyway. Eleanor Roosevelt never allow a person to tell her, you know, who doesn't have the power to say yes. Eleanor Roosevelt.

00;40;34;05 - 00;41;11;20
Speaker 1
Do these words mean anything at all? Before I learned to make paper, before I learned to find the materials, to make paper, before I barter for the knowledge and the materials to make the paper stitched the binding print straight lines on each page to assist me in writing a legible script. We've or knit or crochet or sew a ribbon for a bookmark cures some leather, kill the beast for the leather or forgo leather for a natural fiber grown in my garden, tilled and watered by me on communal land.

00;41;11;20 - 00;41;12;24
Speaker 1
I have earned.

00;41;13;05 - 00;41;13;17
Speaker 4
Income.

00;41;14;00 - 00;41;48;24
Speaker 1
Earned the privilege to cultivate for my benefit. Am I saying anything at all? If I didn't create the means for me to say it? I don't have a clue, an inkling where the ink in my pen was formulated, measured, poured into the plastic tube with a metal tip destined for the distant trash heap beyond my immediate vision in an imaginary junk heaven that is preferable to the real junk islands floating out there where shipping containers pass each other in the night, perhaps on autopilot.

00;41;48;24 - 00;42;24;24
Speaker 1
If not today, someday soon could I be writing anything that means anything at all with such a pen? Hmm. There is a thought from a journey from years ago. And if you've been listening, then you know that Glen Redmond also picked up the habit to join the journey of keeping a journal and if you keep a journal, maybe you'd like to share a little bit from yours like I've been doing for mine.

00;42;25;26 - 00;43;04;02
Speaker 1
We've also been hearing from Pilar Uribe, who mentioned quite a few people already women, notable women, Margaret Chase Smith, Andrea Dworkin. Margaret Thatcher. Condoleezza Rice, Ann Richards, Eleanor Roosevelt, one of my favorites. And we will hear more from Pilar and we're going to go on and listen to more from Glenn is Redmond in interview that Tony Romo has conducted this past weekend and you can watch the whole video because I'm just giving you pieces and bits of it.

00;43;05;05 - 00;43;44;04
Speaker 1
There is more from Tony and from Glennis in a Zoom video that you can find to listen and be heard next, as well as the complete videos and other interviews that Tony and myself have done of authors. And if you keep coming back, you'll find that we will keep talking to authors and people involved in the publishing industry and I don't know, publisher like publishers and maybe even book distributors and bookshop owners.

00;43;44;19 - 00;44;11;15
Speaker 1
And if you happen to be any one of those people and don't want to wait for an invitation, you can contact me at Ed at Listen to be heard next. We're trying to keep the conversation going here to listen and to be heard. And we're going to listen. More now to our poet laureate here in Greenville, South Carolina, our first poet laureate.

00;44;11;15 - 00;44;46;11
Speaker 1
And she'll tell you in a little while that not only is she the first poet laureate, but we're going to have a youth poet laureate who should have been announced yesterday. Now that I'm finally getting this podcast onto the website. And so maybe I can find out more about that, and maybe then you'll be able to find out more about it on the Web page for this particular episode seven of Listen and Be Heard.

00;44;46;11 - 00;45;12;00
Speaker 1
The story contained inside this still partially blank book. Is this book the color of the paper? Is it white ivory off white parchment? Who chose this paper? Was it the cheapest available or is it the best for writing with a pen or a pencil? It's for the West. It's college ruled.

00;45;12;00 - 00;46;07;28
Speaker 2
This poem is called How I Write. But out of hunger I find myself here with teeth and stomach. I lean into the ache crap my whole self against Kitchen Island Edge So much is born here in this place where I cook my foremothers. They are all here to standing right behind me, dressed in the indigo of the cosmos, no recipe or cookbook in hand, just 10,000 hearts singing It's time for you to know to go And as they pour into me with one hand I let the yolk spill into the container of the poem Turn known and unknown, Blend with the salt of my tears and the crying end of my rage that I've planned

00;46;07;28 - 00;46;59;14
Speaker 2
a lifetime around the hand me what I what they have at hand Dust from the stars, water from the rivers, always red clay of the Palmetto or the west coast of the motherland. In this heat I prepare, bake, broil and stew only when they say Ready do I set the table of page and stage, serve what I was born to live and get a machete with sharpest blade they hold my heart just so in my pen they fill blood and dreams in unison They chant Now write My grandmother.

00;46;59;25 - 00;47;38;09
Speaker 2
You don't had a lot of Lowcountry leanings. So the Gullah Geechee culture was embedded in her as well. So that's part of, you know, how people survive the you know, that the trade, the slave trade. So in that is inherent a rhythm. We go hand-in-hand in the morning, you know, we're going down there like you have to listen to understand and the language, you know, it is not really backwards and it is really someone who is getting along with a third grade education, who is making do on the land in a way that most people would not be able to make on the way.

00;47;38;09 - 00;47;57;04
Speaker 2
So it's to me, it's beauty. It's this like the quilts that they made, it's a wove in language in a lot of it is alive. You know, I speak more people like so people are of two minds about me. When they hear me, they call me a Southern poet. But then when I'm you know what I'm here, people say, Well, you're really not.

00;47;57;05 - 00;48;18;16
Speaker 2
Where are you from because you're not from here. Well, there's a lot of things going on in my language, in my tongue, and a lot of it's number one, I speak the language my parents speak like. And when I'm at home, I talk like them and when I'm an Air Force brat. So I have a lot of everything in in my language and I love it.

00;48;18;16 - 00;48;44;20
Speaker 2
But my grandmother was one that I literally had to have translate. And when I first met her, she would say something and I would look at my mom and go, which, you know. And so it was part of, you know, part Southern, part Gullah, part just my grandmother loved what did not articulate. She loved to mumble. And so she would have to just get it, you know.

00;48;44;25 - 00;49;11;10
Speaker 2
And the more time I spent around her, she would she would wine these tales and I would get it. I am the one who had to slow down. I am the one who had to find the rhythm, the flow. And it was that flow is part of me, you know. And instead of being afraid, I had to step into it.

00;49;11;10 - 00;49;31;06
Speaker 3
A wise girl knows her limits. A smart girl knows that she has none. Marilyn Monroe Sometimes things fall apart so that better things can fall together. Marilyn Monroe.

00;49;31;06 - 00;50;16;04
Speaker 1
The lines are blue, not black, so as not to distract from the words meant to be written on the lines, confusion of a sex starved housewife love poems of a lonely teens Shopping Lists, Memos, Dream Diaries, Diatribes, Terrorist plots all destined to be tossed one day, maybe only with a few pages scrawled upon, and the remaining ones blank taunting, haunted by the bands that touched it as it traveled on a river belt that also was created on a line untouched by hands that to touch or recently touched someone who they would never see again, but didn't know that at the time.

00;50;16;28 - 00;50;24;16
Speaker 1
Can these words mean anything? Can they tell the story without knowing the story of the book? It is written in.

00;50;25;22 - 00;50;46;00
Speaker 2
A cancer this year. Three years ago are still do have it. But I had a stem cell three years ago and during the stem cell I made a point to get my grandmother's tombstone because we had in place one and I said, I'm not. If I don't make it through the stem cell, I'm not God. I'm not leaving this earth without honoring her.

00;50;46;08 - 00;51;04;28
Speaker 2
So this is what I did. The last thing I was doing before my stem cell was ordering this tombstone. So it was a year later after I felt better or whatever, my mom and I went down to Lawrence to see her tombstone. And there was a guy at the church. This is Waterloo, South Carolina. So this is really bad country.

00;51;05;16 - 00;51;37;26
Speaker 2
And this guy who was keeping grounds literally started talking. And I did not understand one word. He speaking English. He was speaking English. I had no and my mother was just going. Mm. Yeah that's right. And you know, blah blah blah. And when we got in the car later. No, no dad and, but the, the, the dialect, the, the, the, it was so thick and it reminded me a lot of my grandmother but thicker.

00;51;38;26 - 00;52;01;17
Speaker 2
And that is like that poem. This is how, you know, you're not from here because I still had to look at my mom like I looked at my what do you say? Because I could catch maybe every seventh word, but that really sometimes that makes me feel like an other. And then other times it means, okay, well, you just need to step into your roots more.

00;52;01;28 - 00;52;17;21
Speaker 2
The Waterloo part. I don't live there, so I don't I don't always get that rhythm. So there is just even different counties, like two counties away. The dialect and the rhythm shifts. You know.

00;52;19;17 - 00;52;28;14
Speaker 3
We should all start to live before we get too old. Fear is stupid. So our regrets. Marilyn Monroe.

00;52;29;08 - 00;52;51;27
Speaker 2
Everything in my life is meaningful and purposeful and connected to my ancestors. So I say that's my ultimate. I think my whole house is an alter. I think myself I'm an altar. I'm a vessel. So everything I do, I feel like I've been chosen. I feel like I willingly, you know, ask for help. And I do that on a regular basis.

00;52;51;27 - 00;53;19;23
Speaker 2
I think every book, every poem I write is connected to them. One of the last poems in the book is How I Write, and it talks about how I how, how I feel. I'm connected to my lineage and I do ask for guidance when I'm writing and I ask for guidance in my daily, you know, my daily walk, especially with the health challenges.

00;53;20;02 - 00;53;42;21
Speaker 2
So, yes, and I feel like even before I was writing, I felt like I was chosen by the ancestors. My mother would call me, you know, an old soul. She was sometimes felt one little afraid of me. She said that I stared at her too much and that I was looking into her soul. I was.

00;53;43;17 - 00;54;05;24
Speaker 1
Why write anything? Why speak? Why buy a book and hold it in my lap and look at the blank page? That might as well be the first blank page. Why have I carried this book around with the expectations of having something to write or write about? And it's finite number of pages. And how long did I think it would take me?

00;54;06;06 - 00;54;24;22
Speaker 1
Not this long. But what difference does it make anyway? Because it doesn't matter what I write and I didn't expect to still be writing with my South Carolina pen made in China that I bought at the airport when I visited my mother after dad died.

00;54;26;13 - 00;54;49;01
Speaker 2
Oh, I will say this, Tony. So up until my dad died, 2003, I only wrote in Women's Voices after my father passed. I started writing in Mad Men that men in my family and male who would take on a male voice with no problem. And I. I think that has something to do with my dad transitioning.

00;54;49;13 - 00;54;49;20
Speaker 6
Hmm.

00;54;50;02 - 00;55;11;27
Speaker 2
And so. And I became I was called to go down to Edenton, North Carolina. And I saw cotton as far as the eye can see. And I from South Carolina had seen a cotton mill, but not cotton as far as the could see. Just that side and changed me quick and me like it was like, okay, you really want to see what your ancestors did?

00;55;11;28 - 00;55;32;16
Speaker 2
Here it is, you know, and I was down there for three weeks and I was never the same. I wrote my first poem in a male voice was what my hands say, and it was in my great grandfather's voice. I didn't know what it was until a few months later that it was my great grandfather talking to me, so that my dad leaving was like a portal opening.

00;55;33;00 - 00;55;55;12
Speaker 2
It's like you have the strong connection with your maternal lineage, but here is your paternal lineage that you need to pay attention to. And that's where my great grandfather came in. That's when David Drake started to come in and I was working with the people with that book. Dr. Lynnette OVERBY and Dr. Gabrielle Forman with that book. And they were trying to get me.

00;55;55;13 - 00;56;15;21
Speaker 2
We were working on the Harry as the three heroes, Harriet Wilson. Harriet Wilson, first African-American novelist. Harriet Jacobs, the enslaved woman who hid in the attic from her owner for seven years and Harriet Tubman. And I was like, I'm writing about Harriet. He's like, No, Dave is from South Carolina. And I was like, Wait a minute, no, I'm writing this.

00;56;15;21 - 00;56;37;25
Speaker 2
And then soon as I said that, everywhere I went, people would ask me about David Drake. Like I be out in Birmingham, they would ask me about David Drake, I'd be at a school. Do you know that? I finally after the third time, I said, David Drake, I will write for you and say, Oh, he was an enslaved Potter poet from Edgefield, South Carolina.

00;56;38;02 - 00;57;01;28
Speaker 2
67 emails from I mean, from my mother's front door. I never knew about him. Potter poet, who not only was a potter, but wrote couplets on his pots. And in Greenville, where I live now, we have at our museum the most David Drake Pots in the world.

00;57;02;03 - 00;57;03;05
Speaker 6
Which museum is this?

00;57;03;17 - 00;57;36;00
Speaker 2
Greenville Academy, Zimbabwe. And I recommend anyone to go there and see these parts because they are amazing. So he's you know, he wrote his poems in clay, never on paper. He wrote his poems when it was illegal for a black person to do do such. One of his most famous couplets is I wonder where is all my relation friendship to all in every nation.

00;57;36;00 - 00;57;58;23
Speaker 2
You're not supposed to be writing, you're not supposed to be reading, and you put out this missive to your people on a pod. So he is important for so many reasons and I'm so humbled and and happy and fulfilled to be part of this collaboration, this book. So the so we're already back as a book of scholarship, as a book of poetry.

00;57;58;23 - 00;58;15;05
Speaker 2
And then Jonathan GREENE, who is a go geeky landscape artist, a very famous artist, had already painted Dave in the nineties when nobody was thinking about him. So I wrote a drastically to Jonathan Greene's work.

00;58;15;21 - 00;58;37;23
Speaker 1
Does this book need to be opened? If I open it right in there close and put it away, forget about it. Does that create negative karma? Like if I had $1,000,000 in a very it instead of giving it all away. What if I buried it? If I wrote the rest of my life and put it all away in a drawer?

00;58;38;22 - 00;59;08;19
Speaker 1
What about the people who already touched this book, took it out of a box, put it on a shelf, put it in a plastic bag that I threw away? What about me? What difference do I made to this blank book? I could have filled it with numbers or prose or an essay exclaiming about our president and current calamities committees or pogo orders or confessions or justifications or a checklist bucket list conquests.

00;59;08;19 - 00;59;30;29
Speaker 1
But this book rests intimately in my lap. Well, I wear my robe and my bare legs stick out, placed here by industry, traveling all the way from China, adorned with a ribbon for me to write in in my robe while I sit on a third seat in my bedroom feeling lonely.

00;59;32;21 - 00;59;36;25
Speaker 3
Between two evils. I always pick the one I never tried before.

00;59;37;22 - 01;00;02;10
Speaker 2
Mae West So you know, when, when we were brought here, when our ancestors were brought here from different parts of Africa, of course we landed in the shores of Charleston, the port. We did not all speak. And I mean, I always considered myself in the way we did not all speak the same language because we came from different places.

01;00;02;10 - 01;00;30;14
Speaker 2
So Gullah Geechee is a language, is a hybrid of different African languages and English and Southern dialect. It's all in there. And so I spoke a little earlier on when I said, we're going down in the morning in my grandmother's voice. So that is Gullah. And there's a whole culture, there's a whole rice culture, water culture that stems from the Gullah Geechee and and rituals and customs.

01;00;30;18 - 01;01;05;00
Speaker 2
And a lot of those customs are tie overs from Africa. Even though we were stripped of everything, they brought dance and music and language and, and, and, and making basket sweet grass. They brought that with them, you know, they brought that with them. So the culture is still vibrant and alive. And so Dandan Green who very in touch with his his lineage paints in that vein and I do I do welcome or encourage anyone to check out Jonathan Green check out the book on David Drake.

01;01;05;28 - 01;01;24;04
Speaker 2
It has a lot of scholarship Kwame does writes a foreword, Evie Shockley writes the afterword. There's just a lot of nuggets all of his couplets are compelled in the book, so you get to see them. So it's just one of the best projects I've worked on in my professional career.

01;01;24;04 - 01;01;29;11
Speaker 6
And this is called Praise Songs for Dave the Potter.

01;01;29;11 - 01;01;50;21
Speaker 2
And I'm the first poet laureate of Greenville, meaning that they've never had one. And I always like to start with what is a poet laureate, because many people don't know what a poet laureate is, and a poet laureate is someone who takes poetry to the masses in their whatever offering they choose to give. And so I have a two year appointment.

01;01;50;21 - 01;02;10;03
Speaker 2
I was appointed October of this past year and it's a two year term. My term will be up in October 24th. I have many projects that I have set aside that I will be doing for the city of Greenville, very much like what I've been doing all the time since I've been here. So it's nice to have the title.

01;02;10;17 - 01;02;20;17
Speaker 2
And matter of fact, tomorrow. Is it tomorrow? No, Tuesday. We're deciding on our first youth poet laureate, so I'm excited.

01;02;20;17 - 01;02;21;13
Speaker 6
To host it. Yeah.

01;02;21;23 - 01;02;43;17
Speaker 2
Yeah. So I believe in the power of youth and their voices and lifting them up. So that will be a great platform for a young person in their term will be two years too. So I'm excited to to honor my, my hometown town, which is growing and has grown and has a lot of opportunities for folks. And I'm always in there for the literary arts.

01;02;43;17 - 01;03;05;19
Speaker 2
You know, we got to have a place to sell, you know, I did that in Asheville. I've done that everywhere I go. It's like, let's elevate these platforms for not just myself, but for others. This is legacy work. We're not always going to be here. I'm not going to always be here. Let's make a path that people can walk on and can continue to amplify poetry and literature.

01;03;05;23 - 01;03;07;16
Speaker 6
Do you have a Poet Laureate page?

01;03;08;09 - 01;03;30;15
Speaker 2
I do not have Poet Laureate Page But they can go to the they can go to my website, see what I'm doing. My events is just Glynis Redmond dot com and then the city of Greenville. If anybody wants to book me, they have an inquiry page where they can just you know, it's a form where they can out on the city of Greenville's page you just put poet laureate Glynnis Redmond.

01;03;30;24 - 01;03;47;16
Speaker 2
The best way to follow me on social media is Instagram. I'm Glynnis making poetry Rain. Are I g in Oregon? Yeah, yeah, yeah. And so that's a good place to keep up with my poet poetry travels and my grandchildren.

01;03;47;16 - 01;04;14;28
Speaker 1
You've been listening to a conversation between Tony Robles and Glenis Redmond, the first poet laureate of Greenville, South Carolina. It was not the entire conversation that they had, if you would like to not only listen, but see the conversation, please visit, listen and be heard dot net where you can view the entire Zoom interview that Tony conducted with Glynis.

01;04;15;16 - 01;04;51;29
Speaker 1
My name is Martha Senator and this is Listen and Be Heard. Pilar Uribe contributed quotes by notable women and I was reading from a journal about a journal and I would like to hear from you your thoughts about this interview with Glennis that had so much information in it about, oh, good kitty culture, Dave the Potter, Afro-Asian or Asian or however she said it or versus Afro Carolinian.

01;04;53;01 - 01;05;30;28
Speaker 1
She has a long history here in both South Carolina and North Carolina. And we thank her for joining us here at listen and be heard. You're welcome to join the conversation either by submitting poetry, articles, column ideas, podcasts, proposals, or just feedback about what you heard in this podcast. Please visit, listen and be heard. Now to leave your comments or you can email me at Ed at listen and be heard.

01;05;31;05 - 01;05;57;07
Speaker 1
Net recorded a memo and send me that and maybe I'll play it on the podcast. The point of the whole thing of listening and being heard is to do both. So please join the conversation. You can also go to the web page at listen and be heard dot net for episode seven, which is this podcast that you've been listening to.

01;05;57;18 - 01;06;32;26
Speaker 1
And you will find a list of links to many of the things and people that were mentioned in this podcast, which can further enhance your whole experience of what it is to listen and be heard, especially if you then tell us about it. Stick around to the very end and you'll hear a conversation about turtles catching turtles, snapping turtles, and you'll be able to find the video for that as well.

01;06;33;01 - 01;06;55;18
Speaker 1
It was in the we heard that it's a short film made by my daughter, Crystal Clear Waters. Please join the conversation and I'll be back next week with a new episode. Thank you for listening.

01;06;55;18 - 01;07;18;28
Speaker 4
Yeah, there had to be. So I copied your trap. So I made two more. I got one over there and one. Maybe you take a look and see what you think. How I did because I came down here is something that just like to discount the issues that I have as a way for you.

01;07;18;28 - 01;07;28;16
Speaker 5
Turtle Oh, no, no, no, no.

01;07;28;16 - 01;08;00;17
Speaker 4
Come on, make maybe God to use reaching in there for like that. You were going to just take the turtle, like in the cage? No. Contact the turtle. How are you going to take this up as well and get him all some. Maybe not turn him by us? Yeah, I guess so. He's not up. He can go. We all know is sure word can suddenly defrost in my freezer.

01;08;00;21 - 01;08;01;28
Speaker 4
Tell us. Don't listen to.

01;08;02;02 - 01;08;07;04
Speaker 5
I got all these came for the next man. Oh, my God. Oh.

01;08;08;00 - 01;08;11;08
Speaker 6
No. He got to stop looking.

01;08;11;08 - 01;08;26;22
Speaker 4
Do they hold on for dear life? Oh. Oh, well, I know. Now you got me once that suck. So what do you watch out here? Because he's thinking, Oh.

01;08;26;23 - 01;08;40;06
Speaker 5
Don't get clawed like you get me to be drove me great. And then you know.

01;08;40;08 - 01;08;49;10
Speaker 4
Another filling up that would have been fine. Great. That's right. So yeah, the great move would make to understand that makes me trust me.

01;08;49;27 - 01;08;52;13
Speaker 6
Yeah he my quality.

01;08;52;13 - 01;08;59;19
Speaker 4
My show he did I know he can't get out there. Me and Jimmy here. Yeah. Him my brother had one by dad being.

01;09;00;19 - 01;09;02;13
Speaker 6
I tell you, it's like that.

01;09;02;13 - 01;09;08;00
Speaker 5
It wasn't. He was falsely scary, right? I think we got him. Brought him all the.

01;09;08;11 - 01;09;08;25
Speaker 6
He was an.

01;09;08;25 - 01;09;38;11
Speaker 4
Amateur. We bonded by day. It were a stick by the end day. Oh. For him to have. Oh my God. Yeah. Same when you bring people take turn over so when they pull that back in, straighten it out it pretty fast like you said. I don't see. No that's right. He had go to see that neck lightning fast.

01;09;38;11 - 01;09;54;01
Speaker 4
Yeah That is really scary in there but I said I don't know how to get him from there to there. This like you just reaching in there grab and I was happy I'd raise in the country and.

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